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History

Forty years since the death of Che Guevara – Part Two

Che Guevara was a dedicated revolutionary and Communist. He was also an internationalist and understood that to defend the Cuban revolution it was necessary to spread it to other parts of the world. He attempted this in Africa and Latin America. This was his strong side. His weak side was that he saw the revolution fundamentally as a peasant guerrilla struggle and did not fully understand the central role of the working class in the socialist revolution.

Forty years since the death of Che Guevara – Part One

Ernesto (“Che”) Guevara was executed by Bolivian troops near the town of La Higuera on 9 October 1967, following an ambush. The operation was planned by the CIA and organized by US Special Forces. On the 40th anniversary of his death it is appropriate that we make a balance sheet of this outstanding revolutionary and martyr. Alan Woods in a two-part article looks at the evolution of Che Guevara from his early days to the day he was killed.

100 Years since Vancouver’s Anti-Asian Race Riots - Racism and its role in Class Society

Friday September 7th marked the 100 year anniversary of one of the B.C. labour movement’s darkest moments – the anti-Asian riots of 1907. The riots were incited by the Asiatic Exclusion League (AEL) – an organization formed in San Francisco in 1905 and in Vancouver on August 12th, 1907. Shamefully, it was a coalition of 67 labour unions that founded the San Francisco AEL, and by 1908, it reported 231 affiliated organizations, 195 of them trade unions. This mobilization of organized workers against other workers along racial lines highlights the need for a clear understanding of why racism exists and is allowed to exist, the pernicious role it plays under capitalism, and the real road to its abolition.

In Memory of Ted Grant 1913 - 2006

One year ago today the Marxist theoretician Ted Grant died after more than seventy years of political activity. His death marked the end of an era, but not the end of the struggle for the ideas he always defended.

Film Review: The Wind That Shakes the Barley...

Ken Loach's latest film, The Wind That Shakes the Barley, opens in limited release in Toronto today. Loach famously directed Land and Freedom, an excellent dramatization of the Spanish Civil War. In his latest film, Loach reveals the struggles occurring in Ireland during the formation of the Irish Free State, including the role of the working class. Here, we reproduce a review written by Terry McPartlan, originally published in July 2006.

Remembering International Women's Day 1917: The gains made for women by the Russian Revolution

Today is International Working Women's Day – originally instituted not as a day to celebrate, but as a day for militancy and action. Now many liberal institutions and feminist organizations recognize International Women's Day, but few acknowledge its roots or its historical significance. They have in fact attempted to remove the class content of this day of struggle.

Moscow to Peking -- the real differences

This article, written in May 1965 by Ted Grant, shows how genuine Marxism was able to see the real processes going on in China and not be fooled by the words of the Chinese leaders. Then as now Marxism was a tool that allowed one to see through the fog of seemingly contradictory and incomprehensible events.

Ginger Goodwin: Canadian labour martyr

On 27 July, 1918 Albert (Ginger) Goodwin stared into the barrel of Dan Campbell's shot gun and in a second, it was all over. The bullet passed first through Ginger's wrist, then through his neck, killing him with a single shot. Ginger lay on the forest floor, choking on his own blood. This was the end of the life of Ginger Goodwin, but the beginning of his legend. Ginger Goodwin's murder sparked the first general strike in Canadian history and he remains a source of inspiration for revolutionaries and labour activists to this day.

Introduction to the Spanish Revolution (1931-37)

This month marks the 70th anniversary of the reactionary coup of Francisco Franco, and the beginning of the Spanish Civil War.  To remember the Spanish Revolution, we are publishing this article (originally written in 1995) that spells out the lessons that young revolutionaries must learn from this epic case of betrayal.  We must learn from the defeats, as well as the victories, of working people to prepare ourselves for the future.

The Assasinations of Malcom X and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Over thirty years ago, Malcolm X (1965) and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1968) were assassinated. In the case of Malcolm X, several members of the Nation of Islam (NOI) were convicted of the assassination. In the case of Martin Luther King, one assassin, James Earl Ray, was convicted of the assassination and sentenced to life in prison. However, there have always been many unanswered questions about both of these murders. Despite the convictions, and the ongoing campaign by the government, police agencies, and various authors and pundits to put the assassinations to rest, there have always been many unanswered questions about these murders.